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Ferret-Proofing Your Home

Ferret Nation / Critter Nation Fitter Cage Liners (CAGE NOT INCLUDED) Here at Piggy BedSpreads, we’ve been making fleece bedding for small animals for 10 years.

Ferret-Proofing Your Home

Ferrets are very social and need daily time out of their cages for exercise. Thorough and thoughtful ferret-proofing is an absolute necessity. When approaching ferret-proofing, remember that ferrets are very curious, will chew and swallow things, love cozy enclosed spaces, and have flexible bodies that fit through very small openings.

Ferret-proofing is an ongoing task, rather than a one-time chore. No matter how thoroughly you ferret-proof, you should still carefully supervise your pet ferrets as you never know what they might try to get into next! Keep an eye on what your ferrets want to get into, and make adjustments as necessary.

These are some general ideas to remember when ferret-proofing your home.

Ferret-Safe Rooms
If it is feasible, a good way to ferret proof is to have a single room that is completely and fully ferret-proofed, in which you can let your ferrets romp with the door shut to block access to the rest of your home. If this is not possible, you can ferret proof a larger area but try to block access to the kitchen, bathroom and laundry room, as these are areas that are harder to ferret-proof.

Prevent Escapes
{Make sure your ferret cannot get outside. A ferret can easily tear through a window screen, so keep windows closed at play time if your ferret can reach them. Ideally, make sure that when your ferrets are out, they can not get to doors that lead to the outside. If someone inadvertently opens a door, your ferret might dart out; at the very least lock the doors when ferrets are playing. You should also check for any small openings to the outdoors (e.g. around plumbing, the dryer vent, etc) and make sure the ferret can’t get out under doors. Remember, ferrets can squeeze through amazingly small spaces. A ferret can easily tear through a window screen, so keep windows closed at play time if your ferret can reach them. If someone inadvertently opens a door, your ferret might dart out; at the very least lock the doors when ferrets are playing. You should also check for any small openings to the outdoors (e.g. around plumbing, the dryer vent, etc) and make sure the ferret can’t get out under doors.

Appliances
Ferrets can easily fit under most appliances and can then get up into the workings of the appliance, which can be dangerous if the appliance is turned on or if the ferret finds access to electrical wires. Additionally, ferrets are very attracted to baskets of laundry, and could inadvertently be put in the washer (or dryer) with a basket of clothes. A ferret that makes his or her way into the dryer vent duct now has an escape hatch! If your ferret has access to these rooms, you must find a way to block off the undersides and backs of the appliances, and you must double check the interiors of all appliances before using them or closing them.|Ferrets can easily fit under most appliances and can then get up into the workings of the appliance, which can be dangerous if the appliance is turned on or if the ferret finds access to electrical wires. A ferret that makes his or her way into the dryer vent duct now has an escape hatch!}

Furniture
{Furniture is another favorite of ferrets for getting under and then climbing up into the inner workings. It is a good idea to tightly staple heavier fabric to the undersides of box spring mattresses and couches and chairs, as ferrets can easily get through the flimsy fabric often used here. Recliners are very dangerous to ferrets, as the reclining mechanism can trap and severely injure a ferret hiding under the chair. {Similarly, rocking chairs are a bad idea around ferrets.|Rocking chairs are a bad idea around ferrets.} You also need to check couch cushions before you sit down as ferrets may burrow under or even into them. Cushions should also be checked in case the ferrets are getting into them and chewing on the foam (a danger for intestinal blockages).|It is a good idea to tightly staple heavier fabric to the undersides of box spring mattresses and couches and chairs, as ferrets can easily get through the flimsy fabric often used here. Recliners are very dangerous to ferrets, as the reclining mechanism can trap and severely injure a ferret hiding under the chair. Cushions should also be checked in case the ferrets are getting into them and chewing on the foam (a danger for intestinal blockages).

Watch What They Eat
A common medical problem is blockages in the digestive system from something a ferret has swallowed, especially in kits. Ferrets will chew up and even swallow a surprising variety of items, but things like foam, styrofoam packing, soft rubber toys, neoprene, erasers, elastic bands, and rubber squeaky toys are among the most problematic. Indigestible items swallowed by ferrets can block the digestive system and require surgery to remove. You must also watch that your ferret does not ingest toxic substances, like cleaners, poisonous plants, medications, etc.

The following list is a good starting point for ferret proofing, but is not totally comprehensive. You will need to watch your ferret carefully in your own home to truly identify all the ways you need to ferret-proof your home!|Ferrets will chew up and even swallow a surprising variety of items, but things like foam, styrofoam packing, soft rubber toys, neoprene, erasers, elastic bands, and rubber squeaky toys are among the most problematic. You must also watch that your ferret does not ingest toxic substances, like cleaners, poisonous plants, medications, etc.

You will need to watch your ferret carefully in your own home to truly identify all the ways you need to ferret-proof your home!}

Appliances – Restrict access to laundry and kitchen if possible. If not, block off around appliances (fridge, stove, dishwasher, washer, dryer, freezers) so that ferrets can’t get under them or into the workings (e.g. where the motor or wires are located). Double check for hiding ferrets before turning appliances on or shutting their doors.

Laundry baskets – Double check the laundry before putting in washer or dryer.
Dryer vents – Secure the dryer duct (watch for chewing into the duct) or your ferret may use it to get outdoors or into the dryer.

Air ducts – Ensure your ferrets cannot get into the heating/air ducts or they might get stuck, injured, or end up outdoors.

Boxspring mattresses – Securely cover bottom with heavy fabric or wood to prevent ferrets from climbing into the boxspring.

Recliners – Always make sure your ferrets are nowhere near the mechanisms when using recliners, or better yet, do not use them when your ferrets are out.
Rocking chairs – It is best to avoid these when ferrets are out.

Couches, chairs – Secure the bottoms to prevent ferrets from getting under and up into the furniture. {Also check under the cushions before sitting, to make sure a ferret isn’t napping under them.|Check under the cushions before sitting, to make sure a ferret isn’t napping under them.} Using slipcovers will prevent ferrets from burrowing into the cushions.

Periodically check couch cushions, furniture, and pillows for signs of chewing.
{Small spaces – Make sure there are no small spaces through which your ferret could get out of the house or into the walls. Remember, if they can get their heads into a crack, their bodies can usually follow. Especially check around cupboards, plumbing, ducts, doors, etc.

Under doors – Watch for large spaces that ferrets can get through. {Also, to prevent ferrets from trying to dig out through the carpet under doors, you can place a plastic chairmat (can be trimmed to fit), thin plexiglass, or linoleum under the door (but watch for chewing on these).|To prevent ferrets from trying to dig out through the carpet under doors, you can place a plastic chairmat (can be trimmed to fit), thin plexiglass, or linoleum under the door (but watch for chewing on these).}|Small spaces – Make sure there are no small spaces through which your ferret could get out of the house or into the walls. Under doors – Watch for large spaces that ferrets can get through.

Windows – Make sure any accessible windows are closed when ferrets are out. Ferrets can easily bite through window screens.

Toilets – Drowning danger. Keeping ferrets out of the bathroom is safest overall, but definitely keep toilet seats down. Ferrets may try to get a drink and fall in.
Standing water – Similar to toilets, a sink, tub, or even bucket of water poses a drowning risk.

Cleaning supplies – Most cleaning chemicals are toxic or dangerous to curious ferrets. Keep strictly out of reach.

Cupboards – Most ferrrets will easily get into your cupboards. Invest in the magnetic type of childproofing locks for cupboards (most of the plastic locks allow the cupboards to open a bit, which is enough for most ferrets to get in).
Electrical cords – Encase in plastic tubing to prevent chewing.

Houseplants – Do not keep poisonous plants, and keep other plants out of reach (ferrets will dig in the soil and might chew the plants).

Knick-knacks – Make sure breakable or delicate items are out of reach, and that there are no heavy items that might fall or be pulled over onto your ferret.

Bookcases and High Tables – Ferrets like to climb up and on things, but often can’t climb down. {However, their lack of fear will often make them try jumping even from heights, make sure there is no high furniture to get stuck on.|Their lack of fear will often make them try jumping even from heights, make sure there is no high furniture to get stuck on.}

Open railings – Around stairs etc.; lack of fear may lead to falls.
Garbage – Securely cover or keep out of reach.

Chewing and Ingesting – Watch for things that your ferret might chew and swallow – especially things like foam, soft rubber or plastic, styrofoam, sponges, rubber bands, pen caps, cotton swabs, fabrics, and so on. Remote control buttons are a favorite target.

Fans, Space Heaters, Candles, Fireplaces – Keep ferrets away from these.
Toys – Check periodically to make sure they are not being dismantled and eaten.

A ferret can easily tear through a window screen, so keep windows closed at play time if your ferret can reach them. If someone inadvertently opens a door, your ferret might dart out; at the very least lock the doors when ferrets are playing. You should also check for any small openings to the outdoors (e.g. around plumbing, the dryer vent, etc) and make sure the ferret can’t get out under doors. Ferrets can easily fit under most appliances and can then get up into the workings of the appliance, which can be dangerous if the appliance is turned on or if the ferret finds access to electrical wires. Recliners are very dangerous to ferrets, as the reclining mechanism can trap and severely injure a ferret hiding under the chair.

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How Long Do Ferrets Live?

 

 

 

Q: What is the average ferret lifespan– how long do they live?

A: A ferrets typical lifespan is actually two-fold:

Together with the very early altering practices of the major breeding farms in this country virtually all ferrets bred here suffer from a number of illnesses (like adrenal illness) that shortens their lifespan …

Cancers are completely normal in ferrets in this country. Ferrets in countries that do not have breeding farms and do no practice early modifying tend to live longer, healthier, lives.

Very rarely do you hear of a ferret in the US living over 10-13 years. A lucky owner can get one, with good care, up to the age of 10 years old. That’s because our pets came originally from fur farms, not from hunting stock.

While ferrets are considered the third hottest pet in America, with the popularity of bad diet and lack of exercise, they are second class citizens next to dogs and cats. And yet, ferrets, when compared to cats, are true carnivores who suffer serious ill effects from inappropriate diet and care.

I have had 12 ferrets to date.  Three are still along for the ride with me. Of the 11  12 that have passed about the youngest was 2 years of age, the oldest has recently been 7-8 years old, and also I’ve lost a few at ages in the middle of that (4-6 years of age).

In the U.S.: about 6 to 8 years, with 7 to 8 years being the norm.
UK, European and also Australian ferrets: normally a 15 year life span, thanks to these ferrets having superior genetics.

Why The Different Lifespans?

How Can My Ferret Live Longer?

The book “ferret for dummies” happens to be a great place to start reading up on ferret ownership and lifespan.

I have had 20 ferrets to date. Please don’t make the mistake of getting ferrets before researching, just because you’ve had other pets it won’t prepare you for ferrets, TRUST me. 15 years of pet keeping certainly didn’t prepare me for my ferrets!

Very rarely do you hear of a ferret in the US living over 10-13 years. Together with the very early altering practices of the major breeding farms in this country virtually all ferrets bred here suffer from a number of illnesses (like adrenal illness) that shortens their lifespan …

I have two that are over nine years old. My first ferret died at age five, but only a result of a serious infection that wasn’t common. I live in the US, and yet only one of my ferrets actually have been Marshall’s.

I find the best way for ferrets to live longer is to feed a premium diet (Innova Evo, By Nature for kittens, and usual silver plus “duck soup” weekly), give them loads of exercise (free roam), and get vet care whenever it’s needed. All of mine are in peak condition and have never ever had problems with insulinoma or even adrenal.

They are typically great pets but take a lot work, much more than a dog or cat. Be certain that you know what you’re getting into. After that factor in the cost of brand new playthings, food, litter, vaccinations, and illness/emergency veterinarian visits for the next 7-9 years.

A lot of people say keeping a ferret alone will shorten it’s lifespan. The book “ferret for dummies” happens to be a great place to start reading up on ferret ownership and lifespan.

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What Does the Color of My Ferret’s Poop Mean?

The Tall Corner Litter Pan features a quick release carabiner lock for secure attachment. Simply attach the litter pan to any wire cage and unclip for easy cleaning.

 

Ferret Poop Colors- What Does the Color of My Ferret’s Poop Mean?

Q: My ferret has been eating Fiesta Ferret food, and has some red parts in her poop. Once in a while she has red colored poop, but it’s not bloody and solid. Her poop has gone from dark brown, to a copper color.

Raw foods can also give some very colorful poop– bloodier meats usually produce darker, almost black poop; egg yolk can cause yellowish poop; liver causes black poop; beef can cause dark brown poop, etc. An odd colored poop here and there usually isn’t a major concern.

When To Worry?

You should worry if the stools suddenly turn pitch black (could be a sign of bleeding in the upper digestive tract, a sign of digested blood), or if the poop has actually visible blood in it or if it’s green or slimy (different ferret diseases can cause that).

Diet Changes

Yellow Colored Poop
Yellow, liquidy stool is just another sign that whatever he ate passed through his system quicker than normal. Ferrets can experience gastrointestinal upset just like people do.

Rarely, if it is bleeding from her butt it will be red, she cold have a prolapsed rectum, if she does you will need to soak her food in water before letting her eat it.

Dark Brown Poop
The poop usually comes out about the same color as the kibble when you feed a ferret kibble.

Red Colored Poop
Red and yellow in the poop is most likely food dye. Not to worry, would they put toxins in ferret food? Most likely not.

White Colored Poop
If his poop is white in color, it either means that his liver is not producing enough bile (indicating a liver problem) or that there is an obstruction in his bile ducts.

A sudden switch of your ferret’s diet can also cause discolored stools all the way to upset stomachs even vomiting and refusal to eat. It’s not unusual that he has seedy poo and loose stools if you changed his diet. It can take up to 2-3 weeks for his stomach to settle.

Its normal for the poop to be black after a change in diet. Wait a week for the poop color to return to normal if you just changed her food. As long as it’s not tarry looking and just looks like regular poop, then the color is just from the food you’re feeding.

Black Colored Poop
Black, tarry poop is actually digested blood and there’s some internal bleeding going on (usually a result of stomach ulcers). If you see black, sticky, or tarry poop that smells really bad, then a vet visit is a must.

Nutritional diarrhea will go away after the food that caused it is eliminated from his diet. Dairy products does it. Some ferrets will eat cheese, and green poop happens to them.

I had been feeding mine mainly EVO (a medium brown color) and their poop came out the same color as the EVO; I then switched to Nature’s Variety Instinct Rabbit formula, which is almost black and their poop starting coming out black.

Depending on what is in the actual ingredients in the food and depending on the possible dyes used they can easily change a ferrets poop different colors. If he’s acting normal, I would NOT freak out.

On raw diets, it’s natural for ferrets to have a dark, dark brown stool (these always look closer to ‘older’ poos because there isn’t a waste of nutrients, the ferret’s body absorbs almost everything in the food. Occasionally, smaller bits of bone will be visible in stool.

Green Colored Poop
Green poop in ferrets is most likely ECE, also known as “green slime disease.” Signs of ECE: watery bright green diarrhea (but can be other shades of yellow or green), vomiting, lethargy, and sometimes refusal to drink or eat.

For ECE: stool can be liquidy and yellow, but it is also usually ‘seedy’ or looks like it has birdseed in it. Get your ferret to the vet.

And it is a virus, so you might want to isolate him/her from the rest of your ferrets (if you have more than one), but they could already have it.

Because it is bile that gives poop its normal brownish color, this connection is made. In the absence of bile, poop is white. See a Vet if you see white poop in the litter box.

Green slime can also be nutritional diarrhea, and usually occurs when the ferret has an upset stomach. It just shows that something has irratatied his gut lining.

“Seedy” Poop

Seedy poop in ferrets is a sign of undigested protein. It is also a sign of food passing too quickly through his digestive track (this could be from a temporary gastrointestinal upset, from a chronic condition like IBD, or even ECE).

Generally, seedy or “birdseed” looking poo isn’t a major concern. If it is continual then it can present a problem (because the ferret’s body is unable to absorb nutrients, so it basically starves itself).

“Grainy” poop

The “grains” are usually undigested fat and starch complexes. You might think about stopping the dry food and putting it on a diet which is easily digestible and bland if your ferret has grainy poop.

Liquid Poop

Lots of things can make the poop runny and soft, like a change in diet, excess water drinking, stress, etc

. If a ferret is constantly having soft runny poop it can lead to a prolapsed rectum so if the poop is runny for too long take a look at the ferrets anus just to make sure they are not having any discomfort (the rectum will stick out).

Bulking Up Runny Ferret Stools

You can give 2 doses a day, until he gets better, then give one dose a day for a bit. After that, you can move to a couple times a week. Since I feed them a raw diet, I don’t worry about the fiber, since their diet is devoid of it except for the pumpkin.

My oldest girl is prone to diarrhea and ulcers, and the pumpkin works wonders in stabilizing poo, along with increased bone consumption (it will firm them and also help with constipation [As get out small foreign bodies].

What I’ve found is that 1 TBS of canned PURE pumpkin (either plain or mixed with duck soup) does wonders for ferrets with sensitive stomachs.

What Should I Feed My Ferret for Healthy Poops?

I noticed that since I feed mostly Innova, my ferrets eat less often and smaller amounts AND they poop less. They’re poops are a little softer however, which can make them harder to clean off of carpets if your ferret isn’t completely litter box trained.

My ferrets get three different types of food. soft chewy 8 in 1 (my girl loves the soft stuff) or the crunchy w/ 45% Zupreem and Innova EVO.

When choosing a food look for high protein content and your first four ingredients should contain some sort of meat.

What Does a Healthy Ferret Poop Look Like?

A healthy ferret poop should pretty much resemble a warm tootsie roll. Rolled it back and forth in your hands and made little coils out of it you would have just made your own perfect ferret poop if you took a tootsie roll. A pencil-thin poop could also indicate a blockage.

As long as it’s not tarry looking and just looks like regular poop, then the color is just from the food you’re feeding.

Q: My ferret has been eating Fiesta Ferret food, and has some red parts in her poop. Some ferrets will eat cheese, and green poop happens to them.

A healthy ferret poop should pretty much resemble a warm tootsie roll. If you took a tootsie roll, rolled it back and forth in your hands and made little coils out of it you would have just made your own perfect ferret poop.

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10 Ferret Hacks on Keeping a Ferret

Ferrets are strict carnivores and require meat-based protein. Marshall premium ferret diet and bandit treats combine the freshest meat ingredients with a unique low-temperature process that makes them the best ferret food and treats available.

Here’s are 10 ferret hacks on how to keeping a ferret as a pet. 

What is it like to keep a ferret as a pet? There are several things you should know ferrets before keeping them as pets.

Let’s start with a few facts about ferrets. These are fun and interesting facts about ferrets that you might like to know.

1. Weasel War Dance– When ferrets are excited or feeling full of energy, they’ll perform a wild dance known as the weasel war dance. The ferret does this to expend energy and assert its dominance.

2. High maintenance– Ferrets are more high maintenance than other common household pets such as dogs and cat. Because they’re more prone to medical conditions and they need more supplies and medical care, this is.

3. Legality– Did you know that in some places, ferrets are illegal to own? Check here for a list of states where ferret ownership is not allowed.

4. Rodents– Ferrets often get confused with rodents like hamsters and the guinea pig. In fact, ferrets come from a different species known as Mustelidae.

5. Hoarders– One of the most distinctive qualities of ferrets is that they love to hoard. They might hoard a bunch of stuff in your house if you don’t keep a check on them!

6. Ferocious little animals– Ferrets are some of the most ferocious pets you can keep. Don’t worry, they’re not dangerous, but they will try to assert their dominance and even try to bite if they’re upset.

7. Handymen– Because of their agility and their shape/size, ferrets have been used to run the wire through small holes in spaces that can’t normally be reached. This made them very useful for engineering and mechanical work.

8. Objects of artistic beauty– During Medieval Europe, ferrets were a common subject of artistic paintings. Many popular painters, including Leonardo Da Vinci, drew portraits of ferrets.l

9. Domestication– Ferrets have a history of being domesticated and being used for hunting wild animals. Because of how easily they could crawl down rabbit holes, they were particularly used for hunting rabbits.

10. Lifespan– Ferrets usually have a lifespan of between 7 and 10 years. This is somewhat high for a small animal, which is why many people like ferrets as pets: because they tend to stick around for a while.

They tend to wreck things around the house when ferrets become angry or agitated. They might wildly dance, bite, or break things. That’s why it’s important to keep them satisfied and cater to their needs.

Owning a ferret, like with most other animals, can lead to an increase in your medical bills. A ferret, especially, needs a good amount of medical care. A ferret may feel the need to go to the vet, and it’s a good idea to take it there.

Do ferrets make good pets?
The bottom line is– yes, ferrets make great pets! All these qualities make them a delight for people to be around. Plus, a group of ferrets is called a business, that’s pretty awesome.

There are several things you should know ferrets before keeping them as pets. Ferocious little animals– Ferrets are some of the most ferocious pets you can keep. Maybe other first-time ferret owners have a different experience though– I’ve heard many people tell me about how hectic and strange it can be to take care of a ferret for the first time. The bottom line is– yes, ferrets make great pets! A ferret owner might find themselves at times exhausted with a ferret.

A ferret owner might find themselves at times exhausted with a ferret. For many people, this is what makes having a ferret so much fun. Whenever I wanna take some time off, one thing I love to do is take my ferret to the beach and relax!

Adorable Ferret Plush

Owning a ferret

What is owning a ferret-like?
It was an Angora ferret kit, and it was the most interesting animal I had ever seen. Maybe other first-time ferret owners have a different experience though– I’ve heard many people tell me about how hectic and strange it can be to take care of a ferret for the first time. I don’t know what it is about the cage but ferrets are confused about what to do with it.

Ferrets make good pets for anyone looking for a fun-loving and unique animal who doesn’t mind being a little high maintenance.

Ferrets are also pretty high maintenance, as mentioned before. As pets, you should expect to take them to the vet every now and then. Household ferrets are neutered so you shouldn’t expect to get too strong a smell from them.

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Ferret Colors and Patterns

Prevue Pet Products Feisty Ferret Home offers plenty of space for even the most energetic ferrets to run, jump and play. Cage comes complete with ramps, shelves, and even a hammock to keep your fuzzy friend entertained and content. Featuring two large doors, you are able to easily access your pet while ferrets can’t open these escape-proof” doors. Platforms grille and bottom tray are all easily removed for convenient cleaning. Castered stand provides portability from room to room while the space saver shelf holds toys treats and supplies. Our Feisty Ferret Home will complement any room in its black hammertone finish and measures 31-inch long 20-inch wide 41-1/2-inch high ( 54-inch high on stand) with 7/8-inch wire spacing.”

Ferret Colors and Patterns

If your ferret is not one of the two natural colors of ferrets – sable or albino – it can be hard to distinguish what color she is. There are a wide range of colors and patterns of ferret coats, each with its own distinctive characteristics. What is the difference between color and pattern? What are the colors and patterns you may see?
COLORS vs. PATTERNS
While some people will interchange these two terms, they actually refer to different things. “Color” is the color of the coat (guard hairs and undercoat), the eyes, and the nose. “Pattern” is how that color is distributed or concentrated on your ferret’s body. The only true colors are sable and albino. All other colors and patterns are mutations brought about by selective breeding for desired colors by humans.COLORS
All ferrets have white hair at birth, but as they age, their guard hairs will start to darken (or will remain the same), and the result is one of a variety of different colors.
AlbinoSableCinnamonDark-eyed WhiteSilver Albino
An albino ferret lacks pigmentation, which results in an all white coat and red or pink eyes. The actual white of the coat can range from a pure, snow-white to a yellowish white. They also have pink noses.Sable
Sable is the most common ferret coat color, and it is characterized by dark guard hairs that range from dark brown to black. The undercoat is cream, and it may show through the guard hairs a little or a lot. A true sable has brown or almost black eyes, and the nose can be pink, pink with brown patches, or black. Sables have a dark brown mask of fur around their eyes.

Black Sable
A black sable has guard hairs so dark they appear black and a white or cream colored undercoat that barely shows through the guard hairs. Their eyes are dark brown or black, and the preferred nose color is an ash or blackish brown. Some black sables will have a speckled black or brown nose.

Chocolate
A chocolate is a variation of a sable. Chocolates get their name from the unique milk chocolate brown shade of their guard hairs. Their undercoats are white or slightly golden. Their eyes are usually brown or dark burgundy, and the nose can be pink, brown, or a patchy combination of the two.

Champagne
A champagne is a variation of a chocolate. The guard hairs are tan or diluted chocolate, and the undercoat is white or cream. The eyes are light to dark burgundy, and the preferred nose color is pink, beige, or a combination of the two.

Cinnamon
Cinnamon ferrets are fairly rare, and they are characterized by light brown guard hairs with a strong reddish tone. The actual coat color can range from reddish brown to almost blonde. Their legs and tail are a slightly darker color than their body, and the mask is a shade or two lighter. The eyes are light or dark burgundy, and the nose can be brick colored, beige, light brown, or pink.

Dark-eyed White
Dark-eyed whites (DEW’s) are often mistaken for albinos, but DEW’s do not lack pigmentation. Their fur (guard hairs and undercoat) is mainly white to cream colored, though there may be some dark hairs sprinkled throughout on their back. Their eye color can range from burgundy to brown or black, and their noses are pink, black, or mottled. They are also known as Black-eyed whites or Dark-eyed White Patterns.

Silver
This coat color has a number of variations ranging from light silver to almost gray. Many silvers will eventually lose all of their silver markings and end up as Dark-eyed Whites. The guard hairs can be silver, dark gray, and white. Some silvers have a definite pattern of silver hairs all over their body, while others will only have some silver rings around their tail. Silvers generally lack a full mask, instead having smudges of silver color around their eyes, which are dark brown or black. Their noses can be pink, black, or patchy. They are often referred to as black roans.

PATTERNS
There are a variety of patterns and pattern combinations; below we will go over the basic patterns you may see in your ferret’s coat. Color concentration patterns include roans, points/siamese, and solids. White marking patterns include mitts, blazes, and pandas.
Roan
A roan ferret has 50% to 60% colored guard hairs and 40% to 50% white guard hairs. The type of mask and color of the nose will depend on what color they are. Variations of roans include Black Roan (Silver), Black Sable Roan, Champagne Roan, Chocolate Roan, Cinnamon Roan, and Sable Roan.
Point or Siamese
Ferrets with a point or Siamese pattern have tails and legs (known as the “points”) that are darker than their bodies. This is known as having a difference in “color concentration” between the body and the points. The mask is generally a thin “V,” though Champagne Points may or may not have a mask. Variations of points include Black Point, Champagne Point, Chocolate Point, Cinnamon Point, and Sable Point.
Solid
A ferret with a solid pattern appears to be one color concentration from her head to her tail. While she still has a lighter colored undercoat, it does not show through the colored guard hairs. Solids should have a full or T mask, and the nose color depends on what color the ferret is. Variations of solids include Black Solid, Black Sable Solid, Champagne Solid, Chocolate Solid, Cinnamon Solid, and Sable Solid.
Mitts
A ferret that has “mitts” has four white feet. Any color ferrets can have mitts, and the mitts range from white tipped paws to completely white feet. Because mitts can be present on any color ferret, the masks and color concentrations vary greatly. Other white markings that can be present include a white bib, knee patches, and tail tip.
Blaze
A ferret with a blaze pattern has distinctive white markings that include a long white blaze of fur down the middle of the head from the forehead to the shoulders. They may also have white mitts or tips on all four paws, white knee patches, and a white tipped tail. They do not generally have full masks. Instead, they have rings of color around their eyes or small masks. Their eyes vary in color from ruby red to brown, and the nose is usually pink or pink with a white outline. This pattern is prone to deafness. Blazes can be any color other than white.
Panda
Panda can be any color and their distinctive marking is a white head that extends down to their shoulders and includes the neck and throat (a bib). They may have colored smudges of guard hairs around their eyes, and colored guard hairs form a saddle shape on their backs. Their eyes are generally a shade of burgundy, and their noses are pink or pink with a white outline. In addition to their heads, other white markings include mitts on all four feet, knee patches, and a white tail tip.
CHOOSING A FERRET FOR COAT COLOR
Many potential ferret owners express interest in owning one of the colors that have been created through selective breeding. While silvers, chocolates, cinnamons, and other color variations of the standard Sable or Albino are very pretty, however there is no guarantee that they will stay that color. Most ferrets will change colors throughout their life, and the patterns will change. For example, just because you purchase a silver doesn’t mean that you will end up with a silver. You may very well end up with a Dark-eyed White.Normal coat changes occur as a ferret ages, during periods where they are in rut or estrus, and during the changing of the seasons. Some ferrets will be one color during the summer and a completely different color during the winter. We strongly recommend that when choosing a ferret, you make your decision based on personality and compatibility rather than appearance.
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A Few Tips on Getting a New Ferret

Bear shape fleece design for fun sleep and play area. The bear is durable and washable, great for small animals.

A Few Tips on Getting a New Ferret

 

You can either get a ferret from a shelter or the pet store or from a breeder if there is nearby. When selecting a ferret, pay attention to the eyes, their coating and their behavior. The more active the animal is the better. If you are worried that the ferret may have babies in the future it should be neutered, which they usually are when getting from a shelter or pet store.

Ferrets are charming animals. They have many color patterns to pick from.

If it is legal to own one where you live, another thing you have to know prior to going buying a ferret is finding out. You can easily find this out by checking on Google or with your local fish and game department to avoid problems later on.

Ferrets can be bought at any age.  You need to keep there area clean at all times and keep them in a safe cage and ferret proof the areas they will be wandering around while out of the cage.  As they grow older, you can let them explore a bit more in larger areas.  Best to keep them in smaller areas when they are very young.

Ferrets should be toilet trained as soon as possible.  They will already have some training, as they get this from the mother.  You can put a little of their poo in a litter pan so they will know where to go.  You can also put some poo on a piece of newspaper or dog pads in the corners of the rooms where they will be when they are out of the cage to avoid damage to your house.

The rate of a ferret depends on their size and age. Typically, they cost around $75 to $125. Aside from that, you will likewise have to purchase a few other items like a cage, litter box, toys and vaccinations.

To keep it healthy, you need to discover a vet that is qualified to handle such an animal. Ask around for somebody that can if the one near where you live is not able to do the job.

 

 

 

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Lambert Kay Linatone Shed Relief Skin and Coat Liquid Supplement for Dogs and Cats, 32-Ounce

Lambert Kay Linatone Shed Relief Dog and Cat Skin and Coat Liquid Supplement, 32 Ounces helps reduce excess shedding by providing essential fatty acids and nutrients that are potentially lacking in the diet. This daily skin and coat supplement for dogs and cats is made with Omega 3 and 6 fatty acids that are essential for a healthy, shiny coat and hair and to reduce excessive shedding. Mix with food or feed directly daily. If dog or cat is fed twice a day, divide the serving between feedings and mix with food. Give adult dogs 1 teaspoon per 20 pounds of body weight. Give puppies 1 teaspoon per 10 pounds of body weight. Give pregnant or nursing females 1 teaspoon per 10 pounds of body weight. Give cats and kittens 1/4 teaspoon per 2 pounds of body weight. Double daily serving for first 5 days if skin is very dry. Proudly Made In the USA.

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Ferret Duck Soup

14123 Size: 16 oz. Features: -Dog food supplement. -Add to food or feed directly. -Reduces shedding and scratching. -High in omega fatty acids. -Made in United States. Product Type: -Vitamin/Supplement. Delivery System: -Liquid. Pet Type: -Dogs. Color: -Oranges. Country of Manufacture: -United States. Dimensions: -8 oz. dimensions: 6” H x 2.5” W x 2.5” D. -16 oz. dimensions: 9” H x 2.5” W x 2.5” D. -32 oz. dimensions: 12” H x 3.5” W x 3.5” D.

This is my favorite all around ferret duck soup recipe.  It makes enough for about 2-3 ice trays, per the recipe.  I feed my ferret 1-2 cubes twice a day.  This recipe will last my one ferret about 1.5 weeks.   Will have to change recipe accordingly for more ferrets.

Ingredients for Ferret Duck Soup: 

1 cup dry high quality ferret food.

1 quarter chicken fully cooked and deboned.

2 cups water used from boiling the chicken.

2 hard boiled eggs (leave shells on and include for extra calcium).

10 Papaya tablets (aids in digestion).

1 Calcium Tablet 500mg.

1 tsp Ferretone or Linatone.

1 6 oz can Iams (or other HIGH quality food) Cat or Kitten food.

Add deboned chicken to blender with broth water, papaya tablets, calcium tablets, and blend on high until mixture is pulverized. Add dry food and continue blending until smooth. Add the remaining ingredients one at a time with the canned cat food being the last item. Each cube equals 1 serving. For ill ferrets, feed a minimum of 1 cube every 4-6 hours.

For ferrets on Lasix therapy or severely dehydrated ferrets – add 90 mg Potassium (1 tablet) For Adrenal ferrets – Add 200 IU of dry vitamin E (1 tablet).

Modifications.

For pregnant or nursing jills and also for weaning kits, add 1 scoop puppy milk replacer and 1 Folic Acid tablet to each blender full of soup.

Add deboned chicken to blender with broth water, papaya tablets, calcium tablets, and blend on high until mixture is pulverized. Add dry food and continue blending until smooth. Add the remaining ingredients one at a time with the canned cat food being the last item.

Each cube equals 1 serving. For ill ferrets, feed a minimum of 1 cube every 4-6 hours. The more the better, but feed at least 4 times a day.

 

Interesting Ferret Facts

– A kit has 30 baby teeth, while an adult has 34.

– A ferrets body contains 14 or 15 pairs of ribs.

– Ferrets lack a cecum to digest/ process fuits and vegetables.

– Food fully travels throughout their system in 3 hours.

– A ferrets left lung has 2 lobes, while the right has 4.

North Coast Duck Soup Recipe

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Ferret Colors

HANSA – River Otter Plush Toy – This Hansa River Otter is part of the Hansa Woodland Animals Collection. The River Otter’s approximate dimensions are 9.5 L x 7 W x 7.5 H. Suitable for ages 3 years old and up. When you hold these wonderfully ”life-like” animals, you will see and feel HANSA’s emphasis on quality, which is a result of careful attention to design, custom fabric selection, cutting, sewing, stuffing, eye placement, feature creation, framing, air brushing and finishing. Since each animal is hand sewn, there will be slight variations in appearance. WARNING: CHOKING HAZARD — Small parts. Not for children under 3 yrs.

The sable ferret has mostly raccoon like colorings with a mask on the face, dark paws and tail. The hairs on top, also known as the guard hairs, are normally darker and they are what give the ferret the raccoon look.

White-footed Sable – As the name suggests this color is the same as the Sable with one difference the feet are white also this color can have a white throat patch. The nose is generally black.

White ferret – There are two types of white ferrets. Albino ferret or red-eyed white. Black eyed white.

The red-eyed white – (Also known as the “ruby-eyed white”) is one of the most common colors. They are also referred to as albino ferrets. The body is white and their noses and pads on their feet are pink and as the name suggests their eyes are red. These types of ferrets sometimes get a reddish or yellowish tinge when they reach sexual maturity.

Black Ferret – This color ferret has really black guard hairs, can have a white to golden coloured undercoat with a near or black nose and black eyes.

The black-eyed whites – (Also known as the “onyx-eyed white”) these types of ferrets have a predominantly white coat, although sometimes they may have a few black hairs on their back and tail. The same as with any ferret, once they reach sexual maturity they may develop a yellowish tinge through their coat.

The ferret might also have white paws, body markings and tipped tails. The mixture of the white and the blackish guard hairs are what make this ferret look silvery.

Silver – The undercoat of the silver types of ferrets is white to cream in color. The guard hairs are tipped with grey and the points are silvery or silver tan. Eyes are brown and the nose and pads on their feet are pink or pinkish tan.

Cinnamon – The undercoat is either white or of-white. The guard hairs are reddish brown (the color of cinnamon). The pad leather and nose are either light pink or a darker shade of pink/brick and the eyes are brown.

Chocolate – This is a lighter brown version of the sable. This color still has a mask and black or brown eyes, however it has chocolate colour guard hairs, a white to golden undercoat and a pink nose.

White ferret – There are two types of white ferrets. Albino ferret or red-eyed white. The ferret might also have white paws, body markings and tipped tails. The mixture of the white and the blackish guard hairs are what make this ferret look silvery.

Silver – The undercoat of the silver types of ferrets is white to cream in color.

http://www.redbubble.com/people/octoberiaart/works/11176315-ferrets:

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